What does it mean to glorify God?

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The first answer to the first question in the Westminster Shorter Catechism, a historical document that is theologically timeless, states: "The chief end of man is to glorify God and to enjoy Him forever."  But what does that mean?  How does one attain to this commonly repeated Christian summation of life, "glorify God"?

First, we would do well to look at the second answer to the second question in the Catechism to find the answer: "The Scriptures contained in the Old and New Testaments is the only rule to direct us how we may glorify and enjoy Him."  This helps us get closer to answering the question.  We know that we must find the answer to how we may glorify God in God Himself.

A Piece in the Puzzle


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"And he commanded the chariot to stop, and they both went down into the water, Philip and the eunuch, and he baptized him" (Acts 8:38).
The conversion of the Ethiopian eunuch in Acts chapter eight is one of my favorite stories, for it reveals the reality of evangelism, a duty every Christian should engage.

Yet, evangelism is not the purpose of the church.

On the contrary, worship of God is the sole purpose of the church - the collective, universal people of God.

Tired and Crying for Help!

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"Blessed be the God and Father of our Lord Jesus Christ!  According to His great mercy, He has caused us to be born again to a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, to an inheritance that is imperishable, undefiled, and unfading, kept in Heaven for you, who by God's power are being guarded through faith for a salvation ready to be revealed in the last time.  In this you rejoice, though now for a little while, if necessary, you have been grieved by various trials, so that the tested genuineness of your faith - more precious than gold that perishes though it is tested by fire - may be found to result in praise and glory and honor at the revelation of Jesus Christ.  Though you have not seen Him, you love Him.  Through you do not now see Him, you believe in Him and rejoice with joy that is inexpressible and filled with glory, obtaining the outcome of your faith, the salvation of your souls" (1 Peter 1:3-9).
My prayers lately have consisted of, largely, three words: "Lord, help me."  I have not stamina or energy to continue to meet the demands of life, it seems.  I am doing all that I can just to stay afloat at work, at home, and at church.  Life seems like it is going one-hundred miles per hour and I am swirling in the middle of the vortex, gasping for air and grasping for help.  "Lord, help me" is about all I can utter at this moment.

However, it doesn't need to be that way.

Remembering Our Deliverance


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"Then the LORD said to Moses, 'Go in to Pharaoh, for I have hardened his heart and the heart of his servants, that I may show these signs of mine among them, and that you may tell in the hearing of your son and of your grandson how I have dealt harshly with the Egyptians and what signs I have done among them, that you may know that I am the LORD'" (Exodus 10:1-2).
Just before the eighth plague, God tells Moses the purpose of Pharaoh's hardened heart, the plagues, Israel's captivity, and their future deliverance: "that you may know that I am the LORD."  God's purpose in delivering His people was so that they would know He is the LORD.

Are you a good steward?


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"Or do you not know that your body is a temple of the Holy Spirit within you, whom you have from God? You are not your own, for you were bought with a price. So glorify God in your body" (1 Corinthians 6:19-20).
"There is therefore now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus..." (Romans 8:1). 
In Tolkien's The Return of the King, the reader finds Denethor on the throne in Gondor.  This character on the throne, however, is not the king; he is a steward.  The true king was Aragorn, heir to the throne by lineage and right.  Had Denethor survived to the end of the book, King Aragorn would have certainly held him accountable for his evil stewardship.

Stewardship is taking care of something that isn't yours.  Just as Denethor was given the responsibility to take care of the kingdom until the king arrived, so each one of us has been given responsibility to take care of our own bodies; we are required to steward them until the King arrives.  When He does arrive, He will judge us according to our level of stewardship.